ARL

News Highlights

IEEE Transmitter interviews Dr. Hari Vishnu on the ocean, marine health, earth’s resources and space travel

About 70 percent of the Earth is covered by water, but we know only 5 percent of the ocean’s depths, leaving 95 percent completely unexplored, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. Deep-sea travel has proven to be a solid training ground for space exploration. What can the oceans and autonomous underwater vehicles tell us, both about the world we live in and the worlds we want to explore?

IEEE OES Presidential Award presented to Dr. Venugoplan Pallayil

Each year, the Presidential Award of the Oceanic Engineering Society honors one OES member who has been a consistent volunteer contributor to the Society. This award allows the Society to recognize the work done by a volunteer who is not an elected member of the Society. Dr. Venugopalan Pallayil was presented with the IEEE OES Presidential Award during the OCEANS’18 conference in recognition of his extensive support to the Society.

ambient noise imaging

ROMANIS featured in The Straits Times

The sea may seem a picture of calm, but that belies what lies beneath. Beneath a backdrop of rolling waves, the crackle of coral and chitter of fish are among a myriad of sounds made by one of the world’s noisiest environments.

STARFISH-LEDIF featured in PUB

Water chemistry assessment via sample
collection has always been a labour-intensive
exercise with many inherent physical
limitations. The information collected is usually
discrete in nature, with limited spatial extent
that may not provide a detailed representation
of the three-dimensional (3-D) water bodies.

ucomms

ARL underwater communication technology featured in Wired magazine

How can submarines get online? Mandar Chitre has the answer. “We have all this wonderful wireless technology — why not bring it underwater?” says Chitre, a researcher of underwater communications at the National University of Singapore, and a technical advisor to Subnero, a Singapore-based sub-aquatic internet firm.

ucomms

Internet across oceans and underwater

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – The Internet may feel like it’s everywhere, but large pockets of sky, swathes of land and most of the oceans are still beyond a signal’s reach.
Three decades after the first cellphone went on sale – the $4,000 Motorola DynaTAC 8000X “Brick” – half the world remains